Hugo Weaving Arrives In London For STC’s Waiting For Godot On Tour: Strangerland at SFF

Once again I have to start things off with an apology: my life has been incredibly complicated and busy over the past month. I have posted updates in a more timely manner via my Twitter account, as that seems to be the preferred forum of most of my readers… but I’m still a blogger at heart, so I feel bad when I can’t check in here at least once a week or so. Hugo was actually taking a post-Endgame break for a few weeks (or headed straight into rehearsals for the Godot revival) so there hadn’t been an onslaught of new Hugo Weaving news until this past week.

Godot In London

Hugo Weaving, Richard Roxburgh, Philip Quast and Luke Mullins have arrived in London for the revival of Sydney Theatre Company’s acclaimed production of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot at The Barbican. Performances begin June 4 (tickets are still available here… I know a lot of you are already going. 😉 Unfortunately it’s financially and logistically impossible for me to cross the pond this time, much as I’d love to.)

We have our first new look at the full cast in costume thanks to this photo from STC Company Manager Colm O’Callaghan, who posted it to this Twitter & instagram feed earlier today:


“Our Beckett groupies at the #Barbican #STC #stcontour #LisaDwan #StillWaitingForGodot” Colm O’Callaghan, via Twitter/Instagram
L to R: Richard Roxburgh, Luke Mullins, Philip Quast, Lisa Dwan and Hugo Weaving

A week ago, Australian Actors Equity shared a less formal rehearsal photo of the cast, this one in support of the #SaveOurStories cause, which seeks to prevent legislation which could undermine the Australian film industry by removing incentives/rules which until now have required foreign productions filming in Australia to hire local talent. It’s a natural fit for Hugo, who has long championed and supported the local industry, preferred Australian independent film roles and only agreed to participate in the Matrix sequels if they were primarily filmed in Sydney.  You can read more about #SaveOurStories on their Facebook page and here.


“The cast of STC’s Waiting for Godot – Hugo Weaving, Philip Quast, Luke Mullins and Richard Roxburgh – join the fight to #saveourstories” Australian Equity via Twitter/Facebook

My favorite new Godot-linked item is this joint interview of Hugo Weaving and his longtime friend, artist Nicholas Harding, whose rehearsal drawings of Hugo’s recent STC productions are always a highlight of STC’s programmes and promotions. You can read the online version at The Independent and I’ll embed the print version (from The New Review) below; for once I’m happy to report both versions are identical, with The Independent sharing a decent-sized embed of Graham Jepson’s brilliant portrait of the two.


Minor quibble: Hugo and Katrina have been together since 1984, which is over 30 years, not 20. 😉 Would also welcome a cooking or food tourism web series/vlog from these two ever they decide to take an extended break from their day jobs 😉


Obviously taken while Hugo was still in Sydney, at STC’s Wharf Theatre complex. Photo by Graham Jepson

I hope to have updates, reviews and any new photos to share soon. STC’s news blog has a compilation of many of the recent social media postings and other articles about Godot in London.

For now, enjoy these great fan photos:


“Always nice to see an Elvin king in Fortune Park #hugoweaving” Giddy up Coffee via Instagram
Quite relieved Hugo’s given up on trying to give up coffee. 😉


“The boys have appeared on the tube… must mean #STCGodot is getting closer! @BarbicanCentre #ResumeTheStruggle” Lauren Dodds via Twitter

Strangerland at Sydney Film Festival

Though Hugo Weaving’s London commitments make it impossible for him to appear at Strangerland’s Sydney Film Fest premiere on 5 June, the film is already receiving much more favorable notices than the jaundiced hipster crowd at Sundance managed. Here are a few excerpts, with the usual recommendations that you follow the links back to the sites of origin and read the full text.

Matthew Lowe, The Reel Word: “Strangerland is a haunting film filled with spectral imagery, informed in equal parts peripherally by ancient Aboriginal knowledge, by Australian film, and by not too distant cultural epochs such as the Lindy Chamberlain saga. The disappearance of two children here is less the object itself than a catalyst to examine the psychological decay that simmers just below the surface of a small town’s inhabitants, and how that decay –implicitly connected to the land- is also implicitly responsible for the disappearance.

Something is going on, and none of these characters want to tell you what it is. Strangerland is built on suggestions and implications that are only confronted when the issues are forced, and even then, just barely. Not inappropriately, it has the feel of a sinister reverie, and its questions are more powerful for not having unequivocal answers.

That the film is committed to its own ambiguity is what saves certain scenes –notably, episodes of Catherine’s breakdown- from seeming as arbitrary as they might. It is tempting to say it veers on weird for weirds sake, eschewing logic; but the tone is at least consistent in its progression, in its gradual erosion of psyches.

Likewise, those scenes are the only ones where Kidman verges on overacting; but mostly her performance is welcomingly understated. Playing an Australian disarms her of much the conceit she necessarily adopts playing foreign roles: it leaves her more vulnerable. She is better for it, if occasionally histrionic, but well cast, as are Fiennes and Weaving and the rest…. 8/10”

***

Jason King, Salty Popcorn: “The film is spectacular, hands down I do believe this will be my favourite Australian movie of 2015 and comes across as this year’s THE ROVER. It is easily one of Kidman’s best performances from an incredible career and she eats the screen in this one. Also seeing her and Weaving act together is like seeing Blanchett and Rush, it is a perfect fit and two actors who not only know each other so well but are so comfortable acting together it is almost natural…

As I said earlier Kidman’s performance is just sublime, she gets bloody raw in this movie and goes for it, she appears more comfortable away form the Hollywood studios. Weaving is always amazing, I just love the guy, and his small town cop, thoroughly enjoyable…

The film captures small town Australian desert/ country life perfectly, the dust storm was a bonus and the isolation was uncomfortable. Farrant’s direction was a triumph and P.J. Dillon’s cinematography is a marvel that is matched by the fine wine of Keefus Ciancia’s music that smothers the movie in long drawn out tension oozing in melancholy and desperation.”

***

There’s also an interesting new Kim Farrant interview at The Brag, which notes that at a recent Australian media screening of the film, “as the credits rolled, not just one but two other journalists were reduced to tears by this superb, distressing debut.” Farrant diplomatically discusses the festival receptions to her film thusfar, and her artistic goals in making it.

Strangerland screens on June 5 at SFF with three additional showings (including one with a post-screening Q&A with director Kim Farrant) on the 6th. The film will then tour Australia, mainly via the Palace Cinemas chain, with many websites offering free ticket competitions. (Check my Twitter feed for the latest… or just google Win Strangerland Passes. 😉

Unfortunately, Strangerland’s US distributor doesn’t appear to have anything so inventive scheduled; they’ve already announced an 18 August DVD release (!) following what looks increasingly like a straight-to-VOD launch on 10 July (IMDb shows a “limited” release, so there’s some slight hope for a few arthouses to book the film.) I’d love to be wrong and will share any UIS cinema dates that are announced, but so far I’ve seen nothing. Alchemy doesn’t even list the film on their website, though they’ve posted links to the trailer on Twitter a couple of times. I’m never surprised that US distributors treat Australian films (most foreign films, really) this shabbily, but I’m always disappointed nonetheless.

In Other Hugo Weaving News

Though Hugo Weaving is only mentioned in passing, there’s a great new promotional article about The Dressmaker (featuring and interview with producer Sue Maslin and a new photo of Kate Winslet, Judy Davis and Sarah Snook) at The Screen Blog.  Maslin also discussed actress Sarah Snook’s role, and the film’s all-important costume designs with news.com.au .

Archive Updates

I’ve added a lot of new print material scans to my Hugo Weaving Flickr Archive in the pat week, including the theatre programme for STC’s Endgame (and some promo brochures) a 1994 Priscilla press kit. Just click on the links to view the first item in each set, then use arrow keys to navigate, and click on the image to see the full-sized version.


Hugo Weaving as Hamm in STC’s Endgame (rehearsals) Photo: Lisa Tomasetti

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One thought on “Hugo Weaving Arrives In London For STC’s Waiting For Godot On Tour: Strangerland at SFF

  1. Hi there,
    I just wanted to say thank you for linking to my article on the #SaveOurStories campaign. It’s very much appreciated. Great write-up about what’s going on for Hugo Weaving too.
    Cheers,
    Amy

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